Female Composers: Pieces For Violin And Piano

Catalogue No.: 
AG0004
EAN Code: 
9120040738044
Artist(s):
Composer(s):
Recording Date: 
November 2015
Recording Venue: 
Tonstudio FM Vienna
Release: 
July 2016

“...the field of musical compositions (is) far less accessible to the female gender…” and “...naturally it still is women’s work, who always lack strength and, here and there, inventiveness.” These are the terms used by the Allgemeine Musikalische Zeitung in April 1848; this is how Clara Schumann talks about her own compositions in her diaries during 1846. Women who compose are harshly criticized, their work is viewed suspiciously and their professionalism disdained. The eight female composers of the late 18th to the 20th century, who are described here, persevered in their path despite the lack of recognition and followed their professional career with huge physical exertions and financial difficulties. What was the nature of the objections against composing women? What did the split consist of within the composing guild? - Well, there was indeed a differentiation between male and female composing: On the one hand women were thought of being only capable of handling the smaller form of a song or a small chamber music composition. The symphonic, the opera and the oratorio were reserved for men. On the other hand it was assumed that the female intellect could not fulfill the formal compositional criteria. Such as a strict style, a theoretical structure, agility in dealing with the forms, a serious mind and male strength. To sacrifice these criteria to a female composing style would mean a weakening of the metier. Remarkably enough however they were granted the highest honors. Their works were rewarded with prestigious prizes. They were popular artists on the stages of Europe and beyond. The social elite, the elitist educated middle-class adorned themselves with their company. Their awareness of social shared responsibility expressed itself among others in leading functions and active nursing care in the military hospitals of the World War I. It is alarmingly incomprehensible to come to the conclusion that all of this was not enough to save them from the rapid obliteration from the cultural awareness. Only very gradually there has been an attempt recently to rediscover the milestones that these artists have laid down with all their strength, to edit their compositions and to establish the place they deserve in cultural history.

Clara Schumann (1819–1896)
3 Romanzen Op. 22
1.
I. Andante
03:20
2.
II. Allegretto
02:59
3.
III. Leidenschaftlich schnell
03:34
Cécile Chaminade (1857–1944)
4.
Capriccio Op. 18 – Allegro moderato
04:51
5.
Andantino Op. 31, Nr. 1
04:15
6.
Romanza Op. 31, Nr. 2 – Andante
04:39
7.
Rondeau Op. 97 – Allegro
03:17
Louise Adolpha Le Beau (1850–1927)
8.
Romanze Op. 35 – Andante con moto
05:55
Emilie Mayer (1812–1883)
9.
Notturno Op. 46 – Andante
06:06
Johanna Senfter (1879–1961)
10.
Melodie Op. 13, Nr. 1 – Andante
02:12
11.
Elegie Op. 13, Nr. 3
03:51
Dora Pejačević (1885–1923)
12.
Romanze Op. 22 – Moderato
01:42
13.
Elegie Op. 13, Nr. 3 – Grave con espressione
Maria Theresia Paradis (1759–1824)
14.
Sicilienne
02:57
Lili Boulanger (1893–1918)
Deux Morceaux pour Violon et Piano
15.
I. Nocturne – Assez lent
03:43
16.
II. Cortège – Pas vite (gai)
01:37
Total Time: 
58:28